Street Art Dublin

A Journey through the Street Art of Dublin

Dublin is rarely one of those cities that springs to mind when it comes to street art. New York, Bristol, London, Buenos Aires and Melbourne to name but a few are great advocates of the painted street form. But Dublin has seen a quiet surgance of late and now boasts a formidable collection, albeit in the face of much adversity. It’s time to add Dublin to your street art bucket list.

Loop The names that grace the walls of the city have therefore started to become familiar. Dublin based Fink, Subset, Dan Leo, Maser, Aches and James Earley are responsible for a substantial amount of the art we see in the city and international artists such as Artur Bordalo have graced the streets of Ireland with their talent.


Dublin Street Art Table of Contents
The Troubles with street art in Dublin
Temple Bar Tour
Angiery Camden Core Tour
Dublin 6 Tour
Liberties Tour
Smithfield Tour
North Dublin Suburbs Tour
Dublin North City Centre Tour
Docks Tour
Dublin Canvas
Bees of Dublin
Lost Art of Dublin

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The street art of #Dublin is now an intrinsic part of the Irish capital. This is a detailed guide to the art with suggested tours to see the best murals.

The troubles with the Street Art of Dublin

However an undercurrent exists beneath the art, a political one. Dublin Corporation and the artists are at loggerheads. Any changes to the facade of a building requires planning permission, even with the consent of the property owner, and also the city’s listed buildings can not have their structures altered. This flies in the face of street art, an ever changing medium, where murals are often changed twice in the time it takes to obtain planning permission.


Subset & the Grey Area Project

From this war of words the Grey Area project was born, a movement to paint murals quicker than the corporation could paint them grey. Dublin corporation are only following the mandated laws, and as such are not the villains either. A new era needs to be ushered in therefore. Behind this push stand Subset and as the spokespeople of the Grey Area Project, they call on the local government to be less hypocritical, as on one hand they are seen to support art but are prohibitive to the cultivation, evolution and progression of the public art culture.

This whole saga stemmed from the famed Stormzy mural which was removed upon order by the corporation. A stark grey wall therefore now stands in its place. Alas Stormzy was not alone in its removal, and as a result the battle remains far from over for the artists. Subsets own Gracie mural in the suburb of Rathmines has also faded to grey. As I write this, the Horseboy mural is under threat from the courts, as is the David Attenborough Mural (with a message about climate change). It has had an order issued demanding its removal.

Stormzy – Smithfield Square. Photo Credit: Joe.ie

The curse of Dublin’s development

Dublin seems to be on a jet propelled ride towards modernity. Any area that is deemed rundown or in need of urban renewal, is levelled in favour of new offices and hotels. The cost is as yet untold on the city, but one is already been seen. Above all those areas being upgraded are often where artists bring their own brand of beauty. Therefore the city is finding itself with less and less public canvases and some great art has fallen by the wayside.

One of Dublin’s most beloved and artistic murals was the squirrel by Artur Bordalo. It highlighted the plight of the indigenous red squirrel, which is in danger of extinction at the hands of the North American native grey squirrel. The mural itself was created using thrash found around the city, including for instance a bizarrely placed bicycle. But the mural fell foul to Dublin’s current preoccupation of building as many hotels as is possible. It no longer graces Dublin’s fine city centre.


And yet art conquers all

Dublin’s street art scene remains at the mercy of our prohibitive laws, but it nonetheless has flourished of late. Walls city wide are a constant reminder creativity will triumph over perceived philistinism. Street art in Dublin is alive and well in 2019 in fact.

As I set out six months ago to document and photograph the Dublin scene, I didn’t quite imagine the amount of art that I would find. Many kilometres and some worn shoes later I feel as if I am able to do justice to the art scene. In addition, I’ve endeavoured to separate the art into manageable tours. Bear in mind street art changes as quickly as the minds of its artists and I’ve tried to keep this blog as up to date as possible too. Furthermore, I imagine this is a blog which will see its fair share of edits with time.

As with any capital city, petty crime is a problem in Dublin, and I urge caution while hunting. Above all, stay safe, and enjoy.


Suggested Dublin Street art Walking Tours

To get a geographical sense of Dublin, it is in fact split by the river Liffey, with the area to north commonly known as the North side and the area to the south known as southside. Altogether very imaginative. The Northsiders are traditionally more working class, with the Southsiders more upper class, but those lines have become well crossed over the years. It makes for good banter between Dubs nonetheless.

It is also an ideal way to split the city for the purpose of creating individual tours. Where better to start than in Dublin’s social hub Temple Bar.


Temple Bar Street Art Tour

Kicking off on Fleet Street and the corner of Tesco with Subset’s Don’t Worry Be Happy mural. One of several pieces supporting good mental health health throughout the city, its therefore a good attitude and place to start any tour. From here follow Price’s Lane to the first of the Love The Lanes, an Anna Doran led initiative to bring colour to the small back lanes of Temple Bar. One of the highlights of Temple Bar is the Blooms Hotel, which is painted head to toe by James Earley and celebrates Ulysses, that near impossible to read Joycean novel. Scythe your way through Temple Bars narrow cobbled streets, via Curved Street, before finding Love Lane where the walls and pavements are a canvas.

Subset Dublin
“There is only one way to happiness, and that is to cease wondering about things which are beyond the power of our will” – Epictetus Greek Philosopher
Love the Lanes Dublin
Love the Lanes on Bedford Lane
Dublin Street Art
A Colourful shop front on Bedford Row

Blooms Hotel

Blooms Hotel
James Earley painted Blooms Hotel
Blooms Hotel
Blooms hotel has a real colourful facade
Blooms Hotel
Featuring characters from Ulysses
Blooms Hotel
Skate City and the Pieman Cafe on Crown Alley
Cafe Miniero
Cafe Mineiro by Brutto1
Street Art of Dublin
This artwork replaced what was believed to be an Banksy, but a memorial to a lost friend is a worthwhile replacement. On Temple Lane.
Street Art of Dublin
Portrait by @tizxl on Cecelia st
Street Art of Dublin
Grey area portrait on Cecelia St by Claire Prouvost
Subset Dublin
Pickle Nick by Subset at the Button Factory on Curved Street
Maser art
Portrait of B.P Fallon Irish musician on Curved st by Maser
Street Art of Dublin
Angel or demon? By unknown artist at Meeting House Square
Conor Harrington Street Art
Dead Meat by Conor Harrington
James Earley stag on Essex Street

The Love Lane Temple Bar

Love Lane Dublin
Social commentary
Love Lane Dublin
part of the Love the Lanes exhibit by Anna Doran
Love Lane Dublin
Part of a larger mural
Love Lane Dublin
Vibrant pavement paintings
Love Lane Dublin
En Garde
Love Lane Dublin
Sokme Stiring advice
Love Lane Dublin
An exhibit promoting a youth art initiative

Angiery Camden Core

If time is short and there is only one area that you can visit to sample Dublin’s street art, then this is it. Stretching from Dame Street to the suburb of Portobello it is in fact a treasure trove of murals. It’s also the best area to go for a pint in this humble writers opinion, if you want to meet some Dubs and not just tourists.

The tour begins much as the Temple Bar one left off, on Dame Street. From Palace Street take the first left down the ally way to connect to Georges St and your first mural. Further on you should see the ever insensitive sign, “Why Go Bald” which is a leftover from a hair transplant company from decades ago. It is your marker to take you down Dame Lane and some fine art though. Drury st will bring you back to Aungier St and principal area for Dublin’s street art.

Street Art of Dublin
As the first tour started with the positive, this begins with the negative
Street Art of Dublin
Colourful bird on Dame Lane
Street Art of Dublin
Street Art of Dublin
A tree of unknown origin
Street Art of Dublin
Musical blue haired lady in a doorway on Dame Lane
Street Art of Dublin
Picasso Esque drawings at the Drury Buildings
Street Art of Dublin
How Irish with the beer kegs
Street Art of Dublin
“Never mind the owl or eagle, the crow breeds Intelligence with a playful flavour”- I’ve got to say I like that.
Street Art of Dublin
Digges Street Upper

Liberty Lane Dublin 2

Liberty Lane, located to the rear of Whelans Pub is in fact an ever changing canvas frequented by Dan Leo, Aches, ADW, Brutto and others. As a result it’s a must on any Dublin street tour. The adjoining Camden Row is a favourite of Subset, and takes us back to Camden Street, whose side streets are sure to preoccupy you with even more works.

  • Liberty Lane Dublin
  • Liberty Lane Dublin
  • Liberty Lane Dublin
  • Liberty Lane Dublin
Liberty Lane Dublin
Native American in headdress by Brutto
Liberty Lane Dublin
Cupid by Adw Art
Liberty Lane Dublin
Portrait at Elliotts Cash and Carry on Camden Row by Subset
Subset Dublin
This magnificent vulture is actually an effort to expose the vulture funds whose investment is changing the landscape of Dublin and Ireland- Subset
Street Art of Dublin
The Times Hostel on Camden Place
Kathrina Rupit
A portrait on Camden Place for the Grey Area Project by Kathrina Rupit a Mexican artist
Aches Street Art
Digitised portrait by Aches on Pleasants Place
Street Art of Dublin
A mural encouraging conversation on mental health on Pleasants Place
Maser & Aches
A collaboration between Maser and Aches on Grantham Street- This one feels personal.

Bernard Shaw

Perhaps this article is timely. One location in Dublin has always been a patron of street arts, good street food, hip hop and dance music. But now it closed at the end of October 2019. As a message painted on the outside now asks “where will the art go?” It still there; for the moment. Consequently if you are in Dublin don’t miss the opportunity to see Dublin’s greatest facility for street artists. A great editorial by Una Mullally in the Irish Times highlighted the once again poor planning process which has taken a cultural treasure from us.

The art is constantly been recycled here and up and coming artists often use the walls here to hone their skills. Maser set up shop here eleven years ago for example. One of the most evocative murals the city has seen, graced the walls of the Bernard Shaw. It was a portrait of Savita Halappanavar by Aches, with the letters Y E S emblazoned on top. The abortion referendum drew great debate in Ireland, and Savita had a few years prior sadly lost her life after a miscarriage. It drew great attention from the media, and the public in general, becoming a symbol of the yes campaign. Many came to lay flowers before the mural, or leave notes of sorrow and gratitude. Considering the artist only chose to paint it the night before, its amazing the profound impact it had.

Mural by Aches at Bernard Shaw
  • Bernard Shaw Dublin
  • Bernard Shaw Dublin
  • Bernard Shaw Dublin
  • Bernard Shaw Dublin
  • Bernard Shaw Dublin
  • Bernard Shaw Dublin
  • Bernard Shaw Dublin
  • Bernard Shaw Dublin
  • Bernard Shaw Dublin
  • Bernard Shaw Dublin

Portobello

The Angiery Camden Tour comes continues on Richmond with Masers “Don’t be Afraid” on Richmond Place (the last words of Seamus Heaney, then followed by “Thoughts”, a mural of George Bernard Shaw by Fink on Synge Street. A walk along Dublin’s peaceful Grand Canal is the perfect way to soak in all that art before taking Charlemont road to Peters Place, another favourite location of Dublin’s artists.

Street Art of Dublin
Don’t Be Afraid on Richmond Place
George Bernard Shaw Mural -Fink
A portrait of Playwright George Bernard Shaw, across from the house where he was born on Synge Street

Peter’s Place

Street art of Dublin
This stunning art by Art of Asbestos has in fact an even more stunning back story. The artists mum walked by a Dublin car bomb while pregnant with him, just five minutes before it exploded. The artists reflects on what might have been, and a version of himself that may never have been born. One of my Dublin favourites.
Street Art of Dublin
Media Silence id the Death of Justice by Subset

Dublin 6 Tour

This tour is above all only for those with time and energy to burn. Or a car. Yet it has with rewards for those that do though. If its a step to far I suggest cutting it short and following Harrington St to the immense David Attenborough Mural. Otherwise cross the Grand Canal again and Mountpleasant Avenue to Ranelagh. From here Rathmines is a long walk though. Further south in Bushy Park is another Subset work, before the tour returns to the villages of Terenure and Harolds Cross. Crossing the Grand Canal brings you back to the City Centre and Harrington Street.

Subset Dublin
A Subset Elephant on Richmond Hill, Ranelagh
Street Art of Dublin
Nick’s Coffee in Rathmines
Subset Dublin
Another Subset swipe at Vulture Funds on Ashfield Road, Ranelagh
Street Art of Dublin
Two Fifty Square Coffee Roasters Rathmines
Please Stand by- Subset
Please Stand By by Subset in Bushy Park- The bandstand hasn’t been used in decades
Subset Dublin
Centra on Terenure Road- another Subset
Street Art of Dublin
Bird by mack sign painting for Grey Area Project at Centra Harolds Cross
Subset Dublin
Teresa May/ Brexit and a Simpsons Solution. -Subset, Centra Harolds Cross
Street Art of Dublin
Marian’s Daybreak Harolds Cross Bridge
Adw art
Grey area Project piece by Adw Art- One of my Dublin favourites. It’s on Clanbrassil Street Upper
David Attenborough by Subset
David Attenborough Magnificent Mural – Longwood Avenue

Liberties Tour

The Liberties was formerly one of Dublin’s best locations for street art, owing in particular to the car park of the Tivoli on Francis Street. Sadly the car park has now become a building site, and as a result the art is trapped behind. The Liberties still have a number of redeeming murals though. Continue on up Clanbrassil St from The Angiery Camden Tour or the Dublin 6 tour, and turn onto Francis St. Here is Fink’s famed Stop Wars mural. Passing the trapped art of the Tivoli, you arrive on Thomas Street and the Guinness distillery. Finally take in the elaborate wall above Roe and Co. Bridgefoot Street will then take you to the liffey and the next tour.

Stop Wars Francis St
Stop Wars by Fink on Francis St
Stop Wars Francis St
Beautiful art, on wall painted.
Street art of Dublin
A Thank You to Irish Comedian Brendan Grace
Street art of Dublin
Roe & Co distillery has this just outside the brewery
A cacophony of colours decorates this building just off Bridge Street

Smithfield Tour

Smithfield is now one of Dublin’s trendiest neighbourhoods, which is in fact a far cry from its past. It was once the location of a major market, and still hosts a bi-annual horse fair. As regards street art, it was here that the famous Stormzy Mural debacle helped give birth to the Grey Area Project. The Haymarket and Proper Order Coffee Company are the first stop on your tour, and the square has in addition several pieces around its circumference.

Subset
A portrait by Subset for the Grey Area Project- Magnificent art.
Subset
A boat by Subset at the Proper Order Coffee shop
Dublin Street Art
One of Dublin’s oldest and tallest murals, by an unknown artist at the top of Smithfield Square
Street art of Dublin
An interesting one by Albenty in Montpellier Hill

North Dublin Suburbs Tour

Take the streets by the Jameson distillery to arrive on Church Street and a further route that passes into the suburbs of Phibsborough and Drumcondra. The first work is one of the most famed, Subsets Horseboy, of a horse bound youngster and a backdrop of the Smithfield Horse Fair. Continue on Phibsborough Road to Constitution Hill Flats, for a representation of a real life incident that took place in Dublin, when a train overshot the tracks and ploughed through the wall of Dublin’s Harcourt St Station.

The Pack Page in Phibsborough is also a great sponsor of the arts, and worth travelling to. Continue to Drumcondra and the area surrounding Croke Park, where the art turns next to support of Dublin in GAA. The black and white Brendan Behan adorning the side of a house in Richmond Cottages is an absolute must see also. Finally Dorset St takes the tour back to the centre of the city.

Subset
Horseboy by Subset on Stirrup Lane
Street art of Dublin
Back Page Pub Phibsborough
Street art of Dublin
Constitution Hill flats have a number of works
Subset
Portrait of Gary Rooney an Irish fighter for Grey Area Project
Street art of Dublin
Remembering Bill O’Herlihy Irish sports pundit
Street art of Dublin
Swans by the Royal Canal in Drumcondra
A wonderful tribute to Brendan Behan, Irish poet and writer. Located in Richmond Cottages and by Shane Sutton
Street art of Dublin
St saviours Boxing Club Inns Quay. Not sure why a boxer is fighting Dublin’s Dart with a Dragon head, but it’s a fun drawing.
Street art of Dublin
Colourful Building on the corner of Granby Row

Dublin North City Centre

Returning to the city centre and the shopping region surrounding Henry St, there are two places here in particular that are worth trawling. The first is the fruit markets around Mary Street and Chancery Street, and then Strand Street. Finish with the Italian Quarter and its imposing Last Supper before facing the Liffey and a walk to the docks.

Street art of Dublin
Can’t say what’s going on here but I like it. On Strand Street
Subset
A piece supporting Friends of the Irish environment, who are suing the Irish government for knowingly contributing to climate change- Subset
Street art of Dublin
Repeal the 8th Amendment mural supporting the right to choose
The Last Supper Dublin
The last Supper by John Byrne in the Italian Quarter. A photograph based on the famous painting. Featuring a Judas dressed as a banker. How apt. Adorning this wall since 2003.

Docks Tour

The next and last tour travels through Dublin’s renovated docklands. The design begins on Tara Street with the distinctive Tara Building, before weaving through the maze of streets beyond to Townsend Street and the Liffey on City Quay. A selection of large and impressive murals takes you to Grand Canal Dock though. Follow Mount St back towards the centre to complete the circular tour..

Street Art of Dublin
Tara Building on Tara Street.
Street Art of Dublin
The impeccably cute La Pausa Caffe on Townsend Street
James Earley
Another large scale and colourful James Earley
Street Art of Dublin
Abiding traces by Leah Hewson- a huge artwork on the front of the Tropical Fruit Warehouse, which is an office space in development. Trivia- this building was in fact once owned by U2.
James Earley
Another stag by James Earley
Street Art of Dublin
2 part mural by Ominous Omin
Street Art of Dublin
Right half of the Ominous Omin work
Subset
Tall fella by Subset on Mount Street.

Dublin Canvas

Dublin Canvas is an initiative run by Dublin Council with the aim to paint the Traffic Light Boxes of the city. No longer a street side eyesore, the initiative has therefore been open to anyone who van “pick up a brush and paint”. As a result, it has produced some really unique ideas, and added something different to the scene. By Spring 2019, 325 boxes in Dublin had in fact been painted. I don’t have a map for the boxes, only a suggestion, if you see a traffic light, there’s therefore a good chance the box on the footpath has been painted. Below are a selection of some of the most interesting ones I have come across.

Bees of Dublin

All over the city are also a series of bees particularly in the Dublin 6 area. the work of an artist called Buzzy Bee, they are a particularly motivitianal set. With messages such as Just Bee, Bee Kind, and Bee Free I can guarentee you will Bee Happy to find them For more on these I refer you to the interview with their artist in the Circular.

Street art of Dublin
A bee by Buzzy Bee

Lost Art

Street art is of course constantly changing in any city, and as I compiled this blog, some of the art I intended to include has been painted over or has simply disappeared. Nonetheless they deserve a place in this compilation.

Street art of Dublin
The swan that used to cover the front of Portobello College. Now demolished for a (you guessed it) a hotel.
Street art of Dublin
Old Street Art of Dublin
Street art of Dublin
Wonderful work by Kathrina Rupit
Street art of Dublin
Old Street art of Dublin
Street art of Dublin
Old Street Art of Dublin
  • Street art of Dublin
  • Street art of Dublin
  • Street art of Dublin
  • Street art of Dublin
  • Street art of Dublin

I have used the websites of all the aforementioned artists to keep this blog up to date and the descriptions accurate. For walking tours of Dublin DublinWalls.com has been a great aid, as have also the instagram accounts of subset and DublinStreetStuff. I’m looking forward to continuing my own journey with Dublin and its walls, and above all keeping this guide to the Street Art of Dublin as accurate as I can.

Why not take a look at my walking tour of Brussels and its exuberant comic book art scene, in my blog on its street art and architecture.

I would appreciate a share or pin and also would welcome any edits in the comments section below.

Many thanks for reading.

CarpeDiemEire

Street art of Dublin
The street art of Dublin is now an intrinsic part of the Irish capital. This is a detailed guide to the art with suggested tours to see the best murals.
Street Art of Dublin

31 thoughts on “A Journey through the Street Art of Dublin

  1. That is a lot of street at. Thanks for sharing. When I dined at the Pie Man on Crown in September, I should have looked up. I must have been too tired. Cheers John. Allan

  2. Art does conquer all! The subtle pop of colors and the depictions may have a story behind them but it’s a treat for the eyes first. Not only would this encourage tourism but probably make someone’s day whose crossing a street nearby or just taking a stroll around the city. This should be encouraged if anything.

    You’ve portrayed this very well in your blog, it was almost as if I was there! Would love to read similar pieces 🙂

  3. Omg that David Attenborough one!!! I didn’t realise how much street art there was in Dublin! I’d read about a couple of streets around Temple Bar, which I checked out and to be honest as a bit of a street art aficionado, I wasn’t too taken by it. There’s obviously so much spread across the city though! There’s a building exactly like that colourful one on Tara Street in Shoreditch in London too. I love it! It’s a shame that squirrel is no longer around, I love stuff like that – anything innovative using rubbish is great.

  4. This is my favourite post! I had no idea there was such fantastic street art in Dublin and you have captured it so beautifully. There is such skill and range here! I love the Grey Area Project Piece particularly, but there are so many fabulous ones, I really want to explore the streets of Dublin. It would be a crying shame if this art fell victim to the Grey Wall “initiative”.

  5. That’s interesting about Dublin being on a push for modernity. Reminds me of what my walking tour guide said when I was there, about how they found ruins of this incredibly significant Viking settlement next to Christ Church Cathedral, and everyone lobbied for it to be excavated and maybe one day turned into a museum, but they built an ugly corporate building on top of it instead. Such a loss. As far as street art, I will never understand why cities try to reign it in. It is such a good tourist attraction these days, it’s got to be good for the economy! What a disappointment about that incredible squirrel 🙁

    That portrait by @tizxl on Cecelia St is absolutely stunning, what a talent. Love Horseboy, Brendan Behan, the hummingbird on Dame Lane, the “Aim Well” cowboy cupid, the deconstructed elephant, the Please Stand By bandstand (clever), and the BP Fallon one too. I saw him live one time, he introduced The Kills performance with a spoken word kinda thing.

    I love that you focused on the backstory of what many of these pieces mean. When I’m in a new place, I often feel like I don’t quite “get” the street art, probably because I’m not informed about the local political and social landscape. These are really hitting me harder now that I know. The Grey Area Project piece by Adw Art really sums up the issues you wrote about well, great piece of art.

    That first portrait under Smithfield is the most Irish looking person I’ve ever seen. Is he someone in particular?

  6. Wow. I am kind of overwhelmed by all of this! So much to see. Reading this and seeing some other street art while traveling is beginning to change my view on it. I used to think it meant I was in a ‘bad’ area. I guess there is a difference in graffiti and street art. Lee and I will have to check some of these out if we ever make it back to Dublin.

  7. I want to make a street art tour, even the light boxes are amazing! And the Bees, I love this kind of initiatives, positive and wonderful.
    Really hard to choose my favorite, but maybe the squirrel.
    You made an extraordinary job in this post and the photos are fantastic!

  8. Some truly amazing street art and a very interesting introduction to the current discussion about public space art, legislation and urban development in Dublin. It is good to get to know some of the key names and works marking the city’s landscape. Bordalo’s squirrel was outstanding – so bad to learn it’s gone. Thanks for yet another set of beautiful pictures, your worn shoes were certainly worth the effort!

  9. Some incredible pieces here! I really like the traffic light boxes too, particularly the Tetris one! However disappointing to hear the squirrel is no more! I guess that’s the one downside to street art, there’s no guarantee any piece will stick around for long.

  10. I found your blog while looking for information on some Dublin street art which I photographed recently. In the last three months I’ve been to Dublin three times to photograph street art and while I’ve seen lots of it your blog has shown me that there’s much more to see – it’s also been very helpful in providing me with the names of the artists for some of the pieces I’ve photographed. Thanks for sharing, I’ve bookmarked your blog and will pop back again soon 🙂

  11. In awe… What a fantastic post… One more reason to come back to Dublin and soon! Didn’t realize that Dublin has so much public art on the display, and so unique!!! Only saw the Smithfield Square one during last visit! Really would love to roam the streets and enjoy these fascinating murals! You’d have to be our tour guide though!!! 🙂 Loved reading it, John!

  12. Wow, I had no idea how much street art there is in Dublin! And they are all spectacular and life-like. Great job capturing all of these John! 🙂

  13. Wow, Dublin street art is fantastic and I’m sorry to hear it’s endangered. This is a labor of love, I’m impressed by all the research you’ve done, not to mention walking so far to find all these pieces. Bravo and pinning to my street art board for future reference.

  14. This floats my boat! I appreciate that you give a shout out to some of those artists. Thanks to posts like this one, they are being seen less and less like petty criminals, and more like artists.

    1. Which is exactly what they are and deserve to be. Damn this country is archaic. The local media is recognising them as such too, fondly. At least most of the art is still there after the winter. I’ll be back on the hunt again come spring.

  15. What a fascinating read. I didn’t know Dublin had so much street art. It’s a shame that they are being ordered to cover them up though and what a pity about the squirrel – that piece was stunning.

    1. Yes they still have to cop on here about street art. Well I’m guessing whoever started building the hotel where the squirrel was is deeply regretting it now. Karma.

  16. Wow, that is by far the best blog post that I have ever read on (Dublin) street art. I absolutely love the collection of images here. As street art is so timely, your photos and this post might become really invaluable in the future!! Thanks for the insight into Dublin. Btw: I think the ‘Don’t be afraid’ refer to Heaney’s last words.

    1. Thank you. And cheers for the pointer on Heaney. I’ll be updating that. I do plan to try and keep the post up to date, but will be a tough ask. That’s a lot of street walking. Where are you based yourself?

  17. So many beautiful pieces of art. I like the black and white portraits, but my favorite is “Café Mineira’s painting”. It’s like a child’s drawing! The creation of the Grey Area Project is a very good way to be able to continue this art!

    1. It’s very diverse in the city now. We used to be years behind on street art but are catching up. Minieras is very colourful and youthful.

  18. Wow, this is stunning. I really dig street art and enjoy taking it in. I’m curious if I was too rookie to know this stuff was there on my first and only Dublin visit. While my goal is to only go to new places, I think Dublin (and Dingle) are worth a revisit. If only for the fish and chips and faaaar too many pints of Guiness.

  19. This is wonderful, thank you so much! I have seen many of these and I’m afraid many are already gone. I wish Dublin City Council could embrace public art as an added value, instead of transforming the city in a bidimensional city.

    1. Many have gone, I’m always out and about looking and I do mean to update the blog soon. Luckily there are plenty of new ones to replace them.

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